• Meet Tiera Guinn, A NASA Engineer At 22

    A 22-year-old MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) student, Teira Guinn, is all set to be an idol alumni of her university. You are no short of an idol when at such a young age you are chosen to work as an engineer for the National Space and Aeronautical Administration (NASA) for their Space Launch System.

    An aerospace company, Boeing is building a Space Launch System for NASA for which Teira is the Rocket Structural Design and Analysis Engineer. Guinn designs and analyses parts of a rocket that “she said will be one of the biggest and most powerful in history”, as reported by Huffington Post.

    “When [my mom and I] would go to the grocery store, she would get me to clip coupons [and] put it in my coupon organizer,” Guinn told WBRC News. “By the time we got to the register, I’d have to calculate the exact total, including tax. And I did that since I was six years old.” 

    In an interview with SheThePeople.TV, Vinita Madill, a Space Operations Engineer at ESA, and founder of Rocket-Women, said, “Positive female role models are essential to provide women with examples to look up to when they’re making the most critical decisions in their education or career.”

    This is exactly the kind of  inspiration needed for many young girls who dream to have a career in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) but are discouraged at a very young age. Having a role model is important for young girls as they make critical decisions about their education and their career choices.

    As the famous female astronaut Sally Ride said: “You can’t be what you can’t see.”

    Sally Ride

    PC: mashable.com

    A science whiz from a very young age, this is like a dream come true for Teira. She prepared herself for this since the very beginning, by even choosing the relevant classes in middle school, so as to not falter from her dream of working with a space agency. Wishing young Teira all the love and luck, and may you continue to inspire the young generation, especially girls, who shy away from dreaming big.

    ALSO READ: End Female Genital Mutilation

    Feature Image Courtesy: Huffington Post