• Artificial Intelligence-Driven Bra Can Detect Breast Cancer

    Breast cancer is the fastest growing cancer type in the world. The World Health Organisation claims it’s the most common type of cancer in women and is, more so, on the rise in developing countries.

    Healthcare is given less precedence among women in third world countries and this reality is established by many researches and reports. To tackle breast cancer, an 18-year-old boy from Mexico has invented an innovative bra that can detect the early symptoms to breast cancer in women.

    Julian Rios Cantu is the brain behind the technologically advanced bra that is fitted with 200 sensors. It can analyse the surface of the breast and map the texture, colour and temperature. A woman can wear this bra for an hour in a week to analyze their breasts, making it convenient. The bra is Artificial Intelligence-driven, so all the data received by the sensors are processed in it and then appears on computer or a smartphone app. There are heat sensors in the bra which can identify the change in blood flow if it is feeding cancer cells.

    Julian developed this bra after he found out that his mother had been detected with breast cancer, a year after she got the disease. She was also advised to remove her breasts because of the severe growth of cancer cell in her breast because she got it diagnosed very late.

    It is very important for women to keep having checkups to diagnose any such variation in their breast for better treatment, cure and control over the disease.

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    This ‘smart bra’ can be a ground-breaking invention in this field as until now only a biopsy could determine symptoms of breast cancer in women. In biopsy, a small tissue is torn out to check if it is cancer-ridden. A patient is also advised to go through mammograms, imaging tests, or physical examination to detect lumps or any abnormality in the breasts.

    Having this bra, women wouldn’t have to worry about going to the doctor and they can check the well-being of their breasts all by themselves.

    Picture credit- Maurer Foundation